January 31

Amanda Knox's murder conviction reinstated in Italy

The American woman, sentenced to 28 years, remains in Seattle, and experts say it could be a year before Italy seeks her extradition.

By Colleen Barry
The Associated Press

(Continued from page 1)

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Amanda Knox and then-boyfriend Raphael Sollecito stand outside the murder scene in Perugia, Italy, in 2007.

The Associated Press

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This combination of photos shows, from left: Italian student Raffael Sollecito; slain 21-year-old British woman Meredith Kercher; and her American roommate Amanda Knox. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy’s supreme court reinstated Knox's murder conviction Thursday.

File Photos/The Associated Press

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U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, a Democrat from Knox's home state of Washington, said she was "very concerned and disappointed" by the verdict and confident the appeal would re-examine the decision.

"It is very troubling that Amanda and her family have had to endure this process for so many years," she said in a statement.

Kercher's sister Stephanie and brother Lyle were in the courtroom for the verdict.

"It's hard to feel anything at the moment because we know it will go to a further appeal," Lyle Kercher said. "No matter what the verdict was, it never was going to be a case of celebrating anything."

Their attorney, Francesco Maresca, called the verdict "justice for Meredith and the family."

Sollecito's lawyers said they were stunned by the conviction. "There isn't a shred of proof," attorney Luca Maori said.

In his final rebuttals, Knox's lawyer, Dalla Vedova, told the court he was "serene" about the verdict because he believed the only conclusion from the files was "the innocence of Amanda Knox." He later called the verdict "a big surprise."

The first trial court found Knox and Sollecito guilty of murder and sexual assault based on evidence that included DNA. But the DNA evidence was later deemed unreliable by new experts.

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Judge Alessandro Nencini, center, reads the guilty verdict Thursday in the murder of Amanda Knox’s British roommate.

The Associated Press

  


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