February 27

Boston, NYC mayors to skip St. Pat’s parades

Boston Mayor Martin Walsh says that allowing gay groups to participate is ‘long overdue.’

The Associated Press

BOSTON — Boston Mayor Martin Walsh is threatening to boycott the St. Patrick's Day parade unless organizers allow a group of gay military veterans to march, joining New York's mayor in protesting parade policies on gay groups.

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Members of the New York City Fire Department’s Emerald Society Pipes and Drums make their way up New York’s Fifth Avenue as they take part in the 2013 St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

The Associated Press

Walsh, the son of Irish immigrants, said Thursday he's been trying to broker a deal with the city's parade organizers to allow a gay veterans group sponsored by MassEquality to march in this year's parade. He said allowing gay groups to participate is long overdue.

"It's 2014 — it's far beyond the time where we should be even having this discussion because they're veterans who fought for this country just like any other veteran," Walsh said.

"I made a commitment during the campaign ... that I would fight for equality and that's what this is all about."

But parade planners appeared unwilling to budge.

Lead parade organizer Philip Wuschke Jr. said gay people are not prohibited from marching with other groups. But he said organizers do not want the parade to turn into a demonstration for a particular group.

"The theme of the parade is St. Patrick's Day. It is not a sexually oriented parade," he said. "All we want to do is have a happy parade. The parade is a day of celebration, not demonstration."

In New York, Mayor Bill de Blasio said he will skip the nation's largest St. Patrick's Day parade in Manhattan because participants are not allowed to carry signs or banners identifying themselves as gay.

"I will be participating in a number of other events to honor the Irish heritage of this city," de Blasio said during a press conference earlier this month. "But I simply disagree with the organizers of that parade."

The parade dates from 1762, more than a century before the five boroughs linked to form modern New York City. The traditional event draws more than 1 million people every year to watch about 200,000 participants, including marching bands and thousands of uniformed city workers. It has long been a mandatory stop on the city's political trail.

Since the 1990s, the event's ban on pro-gay signs has sparked protests and lawsuits and led to the creation of an alternative, gay-friendly St. Patrick's Day parade in Queens. In recent years, some elected officials — including de Blasio when he was a public advocate — attended the alternative parade and boycotted the traditional parade.

Michael Bloomberg, de Blasio's predecessor, was a staunch supporter of same-sex marriage rights, but still marched in the traditional parade all 12 years he was in office.

New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton was asked Thursday at an unrelated press conference in Manhattan if he planned to march in the parade and confirmed that he was. He did not elaborate.

Judges have said the private organizers of New York's parade have a First Amendment right to choose participants in their event. The organizers have ruled that some groups, such as colleges or civic organizations, can identify themselves, but LGBT groups cannot.

The Boston parade, sponsored by the South Boston Allied War Veterans Council, has had a long and torturous history on the question of whether gay groups can march.

State courts forced the sponsors to allow the Irish-American Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Group of Boston to march in the parade in 1992 and 1993. In 1994, the sponsors canceled the parade rather than allow the group to participate.

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