May 29, 2012

Supreme Court turns down former Iranian hostages

The high court also decided it will not review whether police appropriately use stun guns.

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court has decided that it will not review the appropriateness of stun guns used by police on suspects.

The high court today refused to hear appeals from police in Hawaii and Washington, or people who got stun-gunned by officers.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said officers could not be sued in federal court. But judges also said officers used excessive force by using stun guns.

Malaika Brooks was driving her son to school in 2004 when she was stopped for speeding. Officers used a Taser three times when the woman, who was seven months pregnant, refused to get out of her car.

Jayzel Mattos was stun-gunned in 2006 in her house by police who said she interfered with the arrest of her husband, Troy.

 

High court turns down former hostages in Iran

In a separate ruling, the court declined to revive a lawsuit against Iran filed by Americans held hostage at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran more than 30 years ago.

The justices did not comment in letting stand lower court decisions dismissing the $6.6 billion class-action lawsuit.

Tho lower courts found the agreement to release the hostages, known as the Algiers Accords, precluded lawsuits against Iran. The suit argued that legislation in 2008 gave the hostages the right to sue.

Fifty-two American diplomats and military officials were held captive for more than a year at the end of Jimmy Carter's presidency by a group of Islamist students who supported the Iranian revolution.

The hostages were released on Jan. 20, 1981, just minutes after Ronald Reagan was sworn in to succeed Carter.

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