October 2, 2013

Government standoff, shutdown continues

The U.S. government may face a long shutdown as Republicans seek to roadblock the health care act.

By Karen Tumulty
The Washington Post

And Lori Montgomery

WASHINGTON — Washington began bracing for a prolonged government shutdown on Tuesday, with House Republicans continuing to demand that the nation’s new health-care law be delayed or repealed and President Barack Obama and the Democrats refusing to give in.

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The Lincoln Memorial, and most of the federal government, is closed Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013, in Washington. The museums that draw millions of visitors to the National Mall closed their doors Tuesday, memorials were barricaded and trash will go uncollected in the nation’s most-visited national park due to the first government shutdown in 17 years.

The Associated Press

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Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. talks on the phone after steppng out of a Democratic policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill continue to scramble to reach agreement on funding the federal government.

The Associated Press

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There were signs on Capitol Hill that Republicans – knowing that blame almost certainly will fall most heavily on them – are beginning to look for ways to lift some of the pressure.

House GOP leaders pushed a new approach to end the impasse, offering to fund some parts of the government – including national parks, veterans benefits and the District of Columbia government. The goal was to put Democrats on the spot by trying to make them vote against programs that are popular among their constituents.

Senate Democratic leaders and the White House quickly rejected the piecemeal strategy. And in a series of evening votes, Democrats helped defeat the measures on the House floor.

Obama made his second appearance in as many days to call on Republicans to fund the government. He was flanked in the White House Rose Garden by about a dozen uninsured people who will be eligible for benefits under the Affordable Care Act, which took effect Tuesday. The legislation, often refered to as Obamacare, remains unpopular, but polls suggest that the idea of closing the government to stop it is even more so.

“This shutdown is not about deficits. It’s not about budgets,” Obama said. “This shutdown is about rolling back our efforts to provide health insurance to folks who don’t have it. This, more than anything else, seems to be what the Republican Party stands for these days. I know it’s strange that one party would make keeping people uninsured the centerpiece of their agenda, but that apparently is what it is.”

At the moment, neither side is feeling a clear imperative to end the shutdown.

Republican leaders prefer keeping the government closed to compromising on health care. And, with polls showing that voters overwhelmingly blame Republicans for the stalemate, Democrats, too, are willing to let it drag on.

Aside from a 10-minute phone call Monday evening, Obama and House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, are not talking. Nor is Boehner meeting with Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev.

Unlike most GOP House members, Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma lived through the prolonged shutdowns of 1995 and early 1996.

Although the ardently conservative Coburn sympathizes with the more junior lawmakers’ strong opposition to the health-care law, he says their shutdown strategy will end badly for Republicans.

“What they’re going to do, they’re going to dig in harder until the pain becomes so bad they yell uncle,” he said. “And it isn’t going to be pain from the president, it’s going to be pain from their own constituents.”

At least 12 House Republicans say they would vote in favor of a “clean” spending bill – one that simply keeps the government open for two more months, without any language about defunding or delaying the health-care law. It is hard to say whether that is the beginning of a trend, and it is also well short of the number that would be needed to persuade the speaker to bring such a bill to the floor.

If the shutdown lasts several weeks – and that looks possible – it will take lawmakers right into a bigger crisis: the expiration of federal borrowing authority. Republicans are hoping to use that deadline to gain concessions from Obama, who has said repeatedly that he will not negotiate over the nation’s solvency.

Treasury Secretary Jack Lew has said he will begin running short of cash to pay the nation’s bills unless Congress acts by Oct. 17. That would raise the virtually unthinkable prospect of a default on U.S. debt.

(Continued on page 2)

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Additional Photos

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Normally filled with visitors and tourists, the empty Rotunda at the U.S. Capitol is seen in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013, after officials suspended all organized tours of the Capitol and the Capitol Visitors Center as part of the government shutdown. A statue of President Gerald R. Ford at center is illuminated amid large paintings illustrating the history of the United States.

The Associated Press

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A National Park Service employee exits the courtyard of Independence Hall in view of a posted sign saying the facility is shut down at Independence National Historical Park on Tuesday in Philadelphia.

The Associated Press

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The Capital is mirrored in the Capital Reflecting Pool on Capitol Hill in Washington early Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013. Congress plunged the nation into a partial government shutdown Tuesday as a long-running dispute over President Barack Obama’s health care law stalled a temporary funding bill, forcing about 800,000 federal workers off the job and suspending most non-essential federal programs and services.

The Associated Press

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A National Park Service employee posts a sign on a barricade to close access to the Lincoln Memorial in Washington on Tuesday. Congress plunged the nation into a partial government shutdown Tuesday as a long-running dispute over President Barack Obama’s health care law stalled a temporary funding bill, forcing about 800,000 federal workers off the job and suspending most non-essential federal programs and services.

The Associated Press

  


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