January 13

So far, health insurance enrollees nationally are an older crowd

Experts expected older, sicker people to be more heavily represented in the early numbers.

By Ricardo Alonso-zaldivar
The Associated Press

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“We think that more and more young people are going to sign up as time goes by,” said Gary Cohen, head of the Health and Human Services office in charge of Obama’s push to cover the uninsured.

2013 Associated Press File Photo/ Brookings Institution

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• Nearly four out of five who signed up got financial help with their premiums.

• The most popular coverage option was a so-called silver plan, which covers about 70 percent of expected medical costs. Three out of five people picked silver. One in five picked a lower-cost bronze plan. Only 13 percent picked gold, which most closely compares to the typical employer plan. Another 7 percent went for top-tier platinum plans, and about 1 percent picked skimpy “catastrophic” plans available only to certain groups of people, including those under 30.

• A few states accounted for a huge share of the enrollment. California alone had 23 percent of the signups. California, New York, Florida, Texas and North Carolina accounted for nearly half the total.

Officials remain confident they’ll be able to get young adults interested. Insurers, nonprofit groups, and advocates are moving ahead with marketing campaigns that were put on hold when the federal website that serves 36 states was struggling.

Administration officials said that in the coming weeks they plan to increase outreach to young people in 25 communities located in states served by the federal website. That effort includes a national youth enrollment day on Feb. 15 and targeted outreach by sororities and fraternities, as well as Voto Latino, which focuses on Hispanic youth.

In Miami, 19-year-old college student Stacy Sylvain was one of the last-minute online signups as 2013 drew to a close. In about an hour, the part-time waitress signed up for a plan with a $158 monthly premium, with the feds kicking in $48. She has a $2,500 deductible. Sylvain said she had no trouble navigating the website.

“Many people have a preconceived notion that young people are healthy and don’t need to go to the doctor,” said Sylvain, who suffered a minor injury when she fell and hit her head during an indoor soccer class in 2012. “Not having to worry about being uninsured and the what-ifs has made an incredible impact on my life.”

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