September 15, 2013

Syrian chemical weapons deal averts military strike for now

The agreement calls on Syria to destroy all of its chemical weapons and requires Damascus to submit a full inventory of its stocks within the next week.

The Associated Press

GENEVA — A diplomatic breakthrough Saturday on securing and destroying Syria's chemical weapons stockpile averted the threat of U.S. military action for the moment and could swing momentum toward ending a horrific civil war.

click image to enlarge

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses reporters in Geneva, Switzerland, Saturday after he and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov announced their agreement on a framework for Syria to destroy all of its chemical weapons.

The Associated Press

click image to enlarge

Anti-war activists rally for peace in Los Angeles last week. A breakthrough agreement on the destruction of Syrian chemical weapons was announced by the U.S. and Russia early Saturday, averting a military strike for the time being.

The Associated Press

Additional Photos Below

Related headlines

WHAT MAINE’S DELEGATION SAID

SEN. SUSAN COLLINS: “I welcome the news from Geneva that Russia and the United States have reached a tentative agreement that could lead to the elimination of Assad’s chemical weapons. If the plan is fully and verifiably implemented, it would be more effective than the limited military attack originally proposed by the President. I believe that the tough questions that many of us raised about the President’s planned military strikes encouraged the Administration to explore non-military alternatives. It is now incumbent upon the Assad regime to keep its commitments and cease its brutal assaults on the Syrian people.”

SEN. ANGUS KING: “I’m very pleased to learn that diplomatic efforts between the United States and Russia have produced a framework for the expeditious identification and elimination of Assad’s chemical weapons arsenal. A diplomatic solution to eliminate his chemical weapons capabilities is preferable to a military one, and is doubly important because it would also remove the possibility of the weapons falling into opposition hands if Assad loses power.”

REP. CHELLIE PINGREE: “This diplomatic solution may accomplish what military intervention never would have: the complete destruction of Syria’s stockpile of chemical weapons. I congratulate Secretary Kerry and the Obama Administration on this major diplomatic achievement.”

Marathon negotiations between U.S. and Russian diplomats at a Geneva hotel produced a sweeping agreement that will require one of the most ambitious arms-control efforts in history.

The deal involves making an inventory and seizing all components of Syria's chemical weapons program and imposing penalties if President Bashar Assad's government fails to comply will the terms.

After days of intense day-and-night negotiations between U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and their teams, the two powers announced they had a framework for ridding the world of Syria's chemicals weapons.

The U.S. says Assad used them in an Aug. 21 attack on the outskirts of Damascus, the capital, killing more than 1,400 civilians. That prompted President Barack Obama to ready American airstrikes on his order — until he decided last weekend to ask for authorization from the U.S. Congress. Then came the Russian proposal, and Obama asked Congress, already largely opposed to military intervention, to delay a vote.

Kerry and Lavrov said they agreed on the size of the chemical weapons inventory, and on a speedy timetable and measures for Assad to do away with the toxic agents.

But Syria, a Moscow ally, kept silent on the development, while Obama made clear that "if diplomacy fails, the United States remains prepared to act."

The deal offers the potential for reviving international peace talks to end a civil war that has claimed more than 100,000 lives and sent 2 million refugees fleeing for safety, and now threatens the stability of the entire Mideast.

Kerry and Lavrov, along with the U.N.-Arab League envoy to Syria, Lakhdar Brahimi, said the chances for a follow-up peace conference in Geneva to the one held in June 2012 would depend largely on the weapons deal.

The U.S. and Russia are giving Syria just one week, until Sept. 21, to submit "a comprehensive listing, including names, types and quantities of its chemical weapons agents, types of munitions, and location and form of storage, production, and research and development facilities."

International inspectors are to be on the ground in Syria by November. During that month, they are to complete their initial assessment and all mixing and filling equipment for chemical weapons is to be destroyed. They must be given "immediate and unfettered" access to inspect all sites.

All components of the chemical weapons program are to be removed from the country or destroyed by mid-2014.

"Ensuring that a dictator's wanton use of chemical weapons never again comes to pass, we believe is worth pursuing and achieving," Kerry said.

For the moment, the deal may not do much to change the fighting on the ground. But the impasse in the international community over how to react could ease somewhat with the U.S. and Russia also agreeing to immediately press for a U.N. Security Council resolution that enshrines the weapons deal.

They will seek a resolution under Chapter 7 of the U.N. Charter, which can authorize both the use of force and nonmilitary measures.

But Russia, which already has rejected three resolutions on Syria, would be sure to veto a U.N. move toward military action, and U.S. officials said they did not contemplate seeking such an authorization.

"The world will now expect the Assad regime to live up to its public commitments," Kerry told a news conference at the hotel where round-the-clock negotiations were conducted since Thursday night. "There can be no games, no room for avoidance or anything less than full compliance by the Assad regime."

(Continued on page 2)

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors


Additional Photos

click image to enlarge

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov shake hands Saturday after making statements at a news conference following meetings regarding Syria in Geneva, Switzerland.

The Associated Press

  


Further Discussion

Here at OnlineSentinel.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)