Politics

February 14, 2013

NRA chief renews call for armed guards in schools

Wayne LaPierre also says universal background checks for gun sales would not make anyone safer.

The Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — National Rifle Association leader Wayne LaPierre renewed his call Thursday for armed guards in schools and urged gun owners to "stand and fight" for the Second Amendment.

click image to enlarge

In this April 14, 2012, file photo, Wayne LaPierre Jr., executive vice president and chief executive officer of the National Rifle Association, speaks at its members annual meeting. LaPierre renewed his call for armed guards in all schools on Thursday.

2012 file photo/The Associated Press

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In a speech billed as the NRA response to President Barack Obama's State of the Union call for new gun regulations, LaPierre told the National Wild Turkey Federation in Nashville that the speech didn't mention school security.

Obama on Tuesday asked Congress for background checks for all firearms purchases and bans on assault weapons and ammunition magazines that hold more than 10 rounds.

LaPierre said the real intention is to "ban every gun they can, tax every gun sold and register every gun owner."

George Thornton, the CEO of the National Wild Turkey Federation, said his group agrees with LaPierre's positions, even though not all of the gun-control proposals would directly affect hunters.

"You really don't need large clips for hunting," he said. "However, I have a very strong belief when you start to limit things, that the limits continue to chip away."

LaPierre also said a universal background check would not stop criminals or the mentally ill from getting firearms.

"Even when prohibited people are flagged by the system now, they are almost never stopped," he said.

Mark Kelly, husband of former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, who was shot in the head in 2011, said in a statement that background checks are a simple and fair way to keep children safe.

"If a dangerous criminal can't buy a gun in a store, they shouldn't be able to buy a gun at a gun show or on the Internet," he said. "That's just common sense."

 

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